Saturday, December 28, 2013


Its not often we're given advice that we carry our entire lives. Save six months of income for a rainy day. You never know where and when lifes mishaps may occur. Family first, no snacks after 8pm and an apple a day are more than grandiose, loose-lipped verbage, but more like honesty from a true friend.

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Mad Crowds

I got like mad crowds
   assemble every night
Kingdom of lost and found-misfits
   watching smoke blow up the sky

Cuz this a chocolate factory, top level
              penthouse,
Aint nothing change but my change
   we stay real like down South.
    Mike Jones.

Reality tip for a smooth player female
   all to the beauty of the body we hail
To no expense will we avail
   burn all your bridges, I got you no fail.

So I lay back chill chocolate factory pimpin,
  glass elevator Willy Wonka, broke another ceiling.

Stuck under roofs hardened hearts so long,
   i used to think where a motherfucker went wrong,
But if you look at my life I think that God is talking back
Boston is my clique.

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

So I give all credit to Mr. Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations.

Today is a Division of Labor Day and that should be exciting the the knowledged man.

That the Division of Labour is Limited by the Extent of the Market

When the market is very small, no person can have any encouragement to dedicate himself entirely to one employment, for want of the power to exchange all that surplus part of the produce of his own labour, which is over and above his own consumption, for such parts of the produce of other men's labour as he has occasion for.
I.3.2
There are some sorts of industry, even of the lowest kind, which can be carried on no where but in a great town. A porter, for example, can find employment and subsistence in no other place. A village is by much too narrow a sphere for him; even an ordinary market town is scarce large enough to afford him constant occupation. In the lone houses and very small villages which are scattered about in so desert a country as the Highlands of Scotland, every farmer must be butcher, baker and brewer for his own family.

''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
The word VALUE, it is to be observed, has two different meanings, and sometimes expresses the utility of some particular object, and sometimes the power of purchasing other goods which the possession of that object conveys. The one may be called 'value in use ;' the other, 'value in exchange.' The things which have the greatest value in use have frequently little or no value in exchange; and on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange have frequently little or no value in use. Nothing is more useful than water: but it will purchase scarce any thing; scarce any thing can be had in exchange for it. A diamond, on the contrary, has scarce any value in use; but a very great quantity of other goods may frequently be had in exchange for it.*84
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The real price of every thing, what every thing really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it. What every thing is really worth to the man who has acquired it, and who wants to dispose of it or exchange it for something else, is the toil and trouble which it can save to himself, and which it can impose upon other people.
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But this proportion must in every nation be regulated by two different circumstances; first by the skill, dexterity, and judgment with which its labour is generally applied;*4 and, secondly, by the proportion between the number of those who are employed in useful labour, and that of those who are not so employed.*5
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take an example. a workman not educated to this business could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry, make one pin in a day, and certainly could not make twenty. One man draws out the wire, another straights it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on, is a peculiar business, to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them.*21 I have seen a small manufactory of this kind where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day. There are in a pound upwards of four thousand pins of a middling size. Those ten persons, therefore, could make among them upwards of forty-eight thousand pins in a day.
Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day; that is, certainly, not the two hundred and fortieth, perhaps not the four thousand eight hundredth part of what they are at present capable of performing,
the advantage which is gained by saving the time commonly lost in passing from one sort of work to another, is much greater than we should at first view be apt to imagine it.
  1. It is impossible to pass very quickly from one kind of work to another; that is carried on in a different place, and with quite different tools.
  2. A country weaver,*31 who cultivates a small farm, must lose a good deal of time in passing from his loom to the field, and from the field to his loom.
  3. When the two trades can be carried on in the same workhouse, the loss of time is no doubt much less.
  4. It is even in this case, however, very considerable. A man commonly saunters a little in turning his hand from one sort of employment to another.
  5. When he first begins the new work he is seldom very keen and hearty; his mind, as they say, does not go to it
  6. The habit of sauntering and of indolent careless application, which is naturally, or rather necessarily acquired by every country workman who is obliged to change his work and his tools every half hour
  7. To apply his hand in twenty different ways almost every day of his life; renders him almost always slothful and lazy, and incapable of any vigorous application
Whoever has been much accustomed to visit such manufactures, must frequently have been shewn very pretty machines, which were the inventions of such workmen. in order to facilitate and quicken their own particular part of the work. In the first fire-engines,*36 a boy was constantly employed to open and shut alternately the communication between the boiler and the cylinder, according as the piston either ascended or descended. One of those boys, who loved to play with his companions, observed that, by tying a string from the handle of the valve which opened this communication, to another part of the machine, the valve would open and shut without his assistance, and leave him at liberty to divert himself with his play-fellows. One of the greatest improvements that has been made upon this machine, since it was first invented, was in this manner the discovery of a boy who wanted to save his own labour
The real price of every thing, what every thing really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it. What every thing is really worth to the man who has acquired it, and who wants to dispose of it or exchange it for something else, is the toil and trouble which it can save to himself, and which it can impose upon other people. What is bought with money or with goods is purchased by
Labour, therefore, it appears evidently, is the only universal, as well as the only accurate measure of value, or the only standard by which we can compare the values of different commodities at all times and at all places. We cannot estimate, it is allowed, the real value of different commodities from century to century by the quantities of silver which were given for them. We cannot estimate it from year to year by the quantities of corn. By the quantities of labour we can, with the greatest accuracy, estimate it both from century to century and from year to year. From century to century, corn is a better measure than silver, because, from century to century, equal quantities of corn will command the same quantity of labour more nearly than equal quantities of silver.
Hope you learned something like I did and continue to do.  I apoligize for not changing the words at all on this one, but this is to deep to change.  So I give all credit to Mr. Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations.
Victor Martinez

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Hi Family

Let's move his radio station to the next level.  Please check out my post below for a client and friend.

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Monday, December 31, 2012

What Do We Need

2012 came to an end,
with so many people whose lives stopped dead-end.

alive or dead, because for one it doesn't even matter. if you need help im talking about the latter.
see you alive, this gift we got, this year three people died, i seen at their spot.

for 2013 im going to call you out. we gonna figure this route.  Roadmarkers laid already pave the way, minorities before me all say "Hooray!  Our fight still today"
When I see you succeed it calms my Native blood.  Happy 2013.

Friday, December 14, 2012

How Do You Make Money as a Caregiver?

As a 5star, retired caregiver(momentarily), the persuasion of the industry has never been to make a million dollars.  So why are we frustrated when caregiving capabilities reach their momentary maximum capacity?

Again, I have taken care of Generals, retired-athletes, mob mafiosos, sons of military nobility and more.  We see glimpses of their life on the deep end of a diving board.  Any further and we are no longer needed, so we hold as long as possible, for them it must always be for them.

They ask you questions like,"Do you think Dad's gonna die today?"  To which the reply is always the same.  You excel at remaining calm during moments of uncertainty.

So if you want to make money as a caregiver, don't be one.  But since I care about you as a caregiver let me give you ten steps to making guap.

1.  Excel at something like wound-care, nail-care, hair cutting for alzheimer's, giving showers, laundering soiled clothing, fixing hospital beds, repairing walkers, wheelchairs.
2.  Learn something about the vision industry, because if you're reading this, it's obvious you're good, but learn about magnification, bugs eyes, talking watches, setting up software for vision impaired seniors, phones with big buttons, remotes with big buttons, keyboards, need I say more.  If you speak a foreign language, use it to get paid.
3.  If you take care of an old person, make sure their underwear/depends are never soiled.  Use a schedule with their permission or make sure you check as much as possible and document the times you checked for your clients. 
4.  Get a Master's degree, work as a caregiver for someone else and hire someone to care for your loved one.  Study while you work at night.  Research shows we care better for strangers, and please don't make me get the research which I posted a while back.
5.   Don't have kids until your ready!
6.  Have your parents create a living will, or hire someone to do it.  With all my resources, If you need me to do it, we got you.  Just stay tuned.  Don't drop me an email.  Wait for me, don't create your living will until we walk through it together.  If you need it now, I can't help you,
7.  Master social media so when you become a manager, you won't look like an ancient rock to your employees.  If you think you're too old to change, you're not alone!  Make friends and have fun with the billions of dollars and thousands of jobs created by the digital social media industry, which is in its infancy stages in my opinion.
8.  Move to where you have to move.  Life is short, our baby-boomer generation lived half of their lives away from their families.  Our pioneers left the East, in search of expansion and conquest.  Be where you are appreciated, not tolerated.
9.  Sometimes your enemies are not people, but against principalities.  Sometimes those people just gave up, avoid them.
10. Be a workaholic, work three jobs, move as often as you have to, but only for as many seasons your plan calls for.  Sometimes, you put all your eggs in one basket, and then your protect that basket until that basket is no longer needed.

If you're taking care of your loved family member, stay tuned, I have a whole crew of PhD students, masters of Gerontology and the Cities of Boston and Baltimore behind me, may my curtains always remain open in business. 

Why do I care?  I still am learning why.

I'm tired 

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

When I ask you to bring me a pink elephant,  I want you to say, "How many and where do you want them."  Red.